Roam Under the Dome

Our blog for the stories behind the exhibit, inside the film and beyond the museum.

Seeing Beneath the Ground: Remote Sensing at the Hahn Site

Seeing Beneath the Ground: Remote Sensing at the Hahn Site
Bob Genheimer
You may wonder how Cincinnati Museum Center’s archaeologists decide where to dig when we excavate a site. In part, our decisions are based on which questions we are trying to answer (e.g. what did they eat, how did they cook, what were their houses like, etc.), and on how much we can accomplish within a short amount of time. But, to answer most of these questions, it is helpful to know with some accuracy what lies beneath the surface. For this, we turn to ground-based remote sensing, also known as archaeological geophysics.
Maya Mammals (and more!)

Maya Mammals (and more!)
Emily Imhoff
If you visit Maya: The Exhibition, one thing you will notice is how often animals are represented in the artifacts shown, and even in the glyphs used in their ancient writing system. Historic and modern cultures all around the world often use images of animals in their art and to decorate everyday objects. These animals might be important food sources, or religious or cultural symbols, or even pets.
Encrustation! Species Interaction in the Fossil Record

Encrustation! Species Interaction in the Fossil Record
Brenda Hunda
Encrusted fossil specimens are important because they provide direct evidence of species interaction at a single point in geological time. With this information, paleontologists can reconstruct community composition, the ecological roles of various fossil organisms and the biological implications of such interactions.
That can’t be good! (for a fossil)

That can’t be good! (for a fossil)
Glenn Storrs
Why then would anyone want to damage a fossil bone by removing a section of it with a power drill? Surely this must be a wanton act of vandalism! Read our latest blog entry to learn why museums sometimes have to break a few eggs to make an omelet and drill a few bones to make a discovery.
The “Dirty” Dozen

The “Dirty” Dozen
Bob Genheimer
The Hahn site, one of the largest and most intensively occupied Fort Ancient-age sites in the Ohio Valley, was occupied at least intermittently from the 13th through the 17th centuries. Our excavations have uncovered lots in those 12 years. And, even though we still have several more years of processing and analysis ahead of us, let’s take a quick look at what we have accomplished.
X Marks the Spot: Knowing Where we are in Archaeology Field Work

X Marks the Spot: Knowing Where we are in Archaeology Field Work
Bob Genheimer
Do you always know where you are? Well, when we are digging in the field, I can usually tell you to within a centimeter or two. Why is this important? It is because the “control” of space allows us to more adequately reconstruct what is going on at a site.
The (Ancient) World Comes to Cincy!

The (Ancient) World Comes to Cincy!
Glenn Storrs
These are strange times, indeed, what with much of the world on lockdown due to pandemic. However, time and events march on and there is perhaps cause to be optimistic for better times returning in the fall.
Early Photography – Cyanotypes

Early Photography – Cyanotypes
James DaMico
The Photography Department of Cincinnati Museum Center holds about 1 million photographic prints, negatives, slides, glass plate negatives, and cased images such as daguerreotypes. This article is about early photography using examples from my personal collection.
What’s in the jar?

What’s in the jar?
Heather Farrington
The Zoology collections at Cincinnati Museum Center are divided into “fluid” and “dry” collections. The fluid collection space is one of my favorites at the museum – it is equal parts creepy and fascinating for most visitors. In the dry collections, specimens are typically skinned (removing all the organs and soft tissue), stuffed, and dried.
Waltzing Matildasaurus!

Waltzing Matildasaurus!
Glenn Storrs
OK, so there is no such thing as Matildasaurus, but there is a Muttaburrasaurus, an Early Cretaceous ornithopod dinosaur from northeastern Australia. Paleontology is not the world’s most lucrative profession, but it does have its advantages, often including the ability to travel for work. During this period of Covid-19 quarantine for so many of us, it seems like an opportune time to relive a paleo-adventure and share a little virtual travel Down Under.
Zoology CSI

Zoology CSI
Heather Farrington
bannerCMC Blog Zoology CSI By: Heather Farrington, Curator of Zoology Even at the dawn of the genetic age, it was
Adventures in Brazil’s Pantanal Region

Adventures in Brazil’s Pantanal Region
Heather Farrington
Have you ever wondered what our curators do on vacation? Are we true nerds at heart and spend our vacations doing something related to our fields – visiting museums, libraries, archives, digging up fossils, exploring nature, or visiting historical and cultural sites?
Be a citizen scientist with project NestWatch!

Be a citizen scientist with project NestWatch!
Emily Imhoff
Looking for an activity to get you out of the house this summer, while maintaining proper social distancing? Want to learn more about the animals living around you? Consider participating in Project NestWatch!
Early Photography – Part 4 of 4

Early Photography – Part 4 of 4
James DaMico
The Photography Department of Cincinnati Museum Center holds about 1 million photographic prints, negatives, slides, glass plate negatives, and cased images such as daguerreotype. This article is about early photography using examples from our collection.
The Spanish Flu

The Spanish Flu
Jill Beitz
In the midst of the 1918 influenza pandemic, Cincinnati’s Mayor made the decision to give up. There was pressure from businesses, saloons, clergy and citizens to allow them to get back to normal daily life. How did the city get to this point and what happened before and after?

Loading...