Cincinnati’s Vanished Yellow Wares

Their yellow colors were bright and cheerful, a sharp contrast to their dull sanitary and kitchenware predecessors – redwares and stonewares. Nineteenth-century American yellow wares, earthenwares with a buff paste and a clear glaze, were both functional and inexpensive. In most cases, they were the product of an assembly line process – a system that attempted to standardize output using relatively cheap raw materials and labor.

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Seeing Beneath the Ground: Remote Sensing at the Hahn Site

You may wonder how Cincinnati Museum Center’s archaeologists decide where to dig when we excavate a site. In part, our decisions are based on which questions we are trying to answer (e.g. what did they eat, how did they cook, what were their houses like, etc.), and on how much we can accomplish within a short amount of time. But, to answer most of these questions, it is helpful to know with some accuracy what lies beneath the surface. For this, we turn to ground-based remote sensing, also known as archaeological geophysics.

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The “Dirty” Dozen

The Hahn site, one of the largest and most intensively occupied Fort Ancient-age sites in the Ohio Valley, was occupied at least intermittently from the 13th through the 17th centuries. Our excavations have uncovered lots in those 12 years. And, even though we still have several more years of processing and analysis ahead of us, let’s take a quick look at what we have accomplished.

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Bob Genheimer Ask a Curator

#AskACurator with Bob Genheimer, George Rieveschl Curator of Archaeology

#AskACurator with Bob Genheimer, George Rieveschl Curator of Archaeology

By: Bob Genheimer, George Rieveschl Curator of Archaeology

Bob Genheimer, our George Rieveschl Curator of Archaeology, answers your questions about the job of a curator and archaeologist.